Families

The Oshkosh Area School District strives to provide families with the resources they need to ensure their children's success.  This page contains a wide range of information for Merrill Elementary School parents/guardians. If there is something you are unable to locate, please use the search tool in the upper right-hand corner of this page to search within the Merrill Elementary School website, or contact the school office and we will be happy to assist you. 

NOTE: To search for district resources, please navigate to the district homepage and use the search tool in the upper right-hand corner.

Important Information

School Supplies List

Merrill Elementary School

2019-2020 School Year

 

Please Label Art Shirts, Headphones and Gym Shoes With Your Child’s Name

 

Fifth Grade

Please do not label all supplies ONLY label Gym Shoes, Deodorant and headphones/earbuds

1 Family Photo

1 Backpack

48 Sharpened, #2 Pencils 

(more may be needed throughout the year)

1 Pack Colored Pencils

2 Highlighter

1  Pencil Case

1 Scissors

1 manual pencil sharpener (not electric)

4 lg. glue stick/ or bottle

1 Pack Wide-Lined loose leaf Notebook Paper

8 Wide-Lined Spiral Notebooks

8 each 2-Pocket Plastic Folders

2 Large Boxes Kleenex

1 box  sandwich bags A-L

1 box gallons bags M-Z

1 Pair of Gym Tennis Shoes 

(Please label them– they will be kept at school.)

Deodorant

1 pair of headphones or earbuds 

(Please place in labeled gallon size ziplock bag)

6 Sticky note pads size 3x3

1 box of marker

1 pack durable post-it tabs

1 black sharpie

Fourth Grade

NO Trapper Keeper/Binders- Please do not label supplies unless stated

1 Backpack

1 box of 8 markers

36  #2 Pencils (may need more)

1 Pack Pencil Top Erasers

1 Pack 24-Colored Pencils

1 Pencil Case or box

4 Glue Sticks

1 Scissors (6 inch, sharp)

5 Pack Post It Note Pads 4x4 or 3x3

5 PLASTIC Folders with prongs (1 each- red,blue, yellow, green and purple)

7 Wide-Lined spiral notebooks (2 red, 2 yellow, 1 green, 1 blue and 1 purple)

3 Wide-Lined Composition Notebooks

1 Box Sandwich or Gallon size Ziploc  Bags

2 Large Boxes Kleenex

1 pair of headphones or earbuds (Please place in labeled gallon size ziplock bag)

1 Paint Shirt (Art) (Please label)

1 Pair of Gym Tennis Shoes (Please label, they will be kept at school)


 

Free stock photos of school supplies ยท Pexels

Third Grade

NO TRAPPER KEEPERS/BINDERS-Please don’t label

supplies unless stated

1 Backpack

1 box of 8 markers

36 #2 Pencils (may need more)Book and Pencil

1 Pack Pencil Top Erasers

1 Pack 24 Colored Pencils

1 Pencil Case

4 Glue Sticks

1 Scissors (6 inch, sharp)

4 sticky note pads size 3inx3in

5 PLASTIC Folders  with prongs

(1 each - red, blue, yellow, green, and purple)

1 inch Post –it Durable tabs– red/ yellow/ blue

8 Wide-Lined spiral notebooks 

( 2 each-green,purple,red,yellow)

1 Box each Ziploc Bags gallon and sandwich size

2 Large Boxes Kleenex

1 Hand Sanitizer

1 pair of headphones or earbuds (Please place in labeled gallon size ziplock bag)

1 Paint Shirt (Art) (Please label)

1 Pair of Gym Tennis Shoes 

(Please label they   will be kept at school.) 

Second Grade

Please label all items marked with an asterisk*

1 Backpack*

1 Personal Pencil Sharpener that holds shavings*

4 Large erasers*

2 Set of Basic Color Wide-Tipped Markers*

2 box of crayons*

4 Plastic folders*

1 plastic pencil case* 

4 Spiral Notebooks Wide Lined*

2 Wide Lined composition notebooks*

1—2 inch binder*

1 Paint Shirt (Art, please print child’s name on front)*

1 Pair of Gym Tennis Shoes to be left at school*

1 pair of headphones/Earbuds (Please send in a labeled zip lock bag)*

 

No Labeling needed

1 box ziplock bags – A-I  gallon size, J-R sandwich size, S-Z quart size.

30 Sharpened #2 Pencils

4 plain colored sticky note pads 3x3

8 Glue Sticks

1 Large Box Kleenex

 

First Grade

Please do not label school supplies, ONLY label Art shirt,Gym shoes and headphones. 

 

1 Backpack

2 Boxes of 24 Crayola Crayons

1 Eraser (pink or light green)

24 wood Pencils

2 set Markers Classic colors (wide)

8 Glue Sticks

8 Plastic Folders—1 blue, 1 green, 6 red

1—1 inch 3 ring binder

4—Sticky note pads 3x3

2  Wide Lined composition books

1 Box Ziploc Bags (gallon or sandwich)

2 Large Box Kleenex

1 Old, Large T-shirt for Art Class 

(please print child’s name on the front)

1 Pair of Gym Tennis Shoes 

 (Please label them— they will be kept at school)

1 pair of headphones 

 (Please place in labeled gallon size ziplock bag)

Kindergarten


Backpack

· 1 Large backpack

· 1 Pair scissors 

(Fiskars is preferred)

· 2 Box of 24 Crayons

· 8 glue sticks

· 1 hard plastic pencil case

· 12 sharpened pencils

· 2 Boxes of Crayola Markers (Classic Washable)

· 3 plastic folders (red and green, blue)

· 1 box of Ziploc bags

   Last names starting with (A-L) quart size

   Last names starting with (M-Z) gallon size

· 2 boxes of Kleenex

· 1 old, large T-shirt for art class 

(please put your child’s name on the front in permanent maker)

· 1 pair of Velcro tennis shoes for gym 

  (please label them – they will be kept at school)

· 1 pair of headphones 

   (Please place in labeled gallon size ziplock bag)

 

Absence Info and Daily Schedule

General Information

Reporting Student Absences 

It is very important to call your student in when they will not be attending school. When calling in student absences, please be sure to leave a message on the school office voicemail. Attendance is carefully monitored. Thank you for your assistance in this matter. For ALL absences please call: 920-424-0420

Check In and Check Out Procedures

ALL visitors must sign in at the office and have a badge in order to be in the halls.This includes dropping off and picking up students at the beginning/end of the day.Thank you for your cooperation in keeping our students safe.

School Day Schedule

7:15 – 7:40 Breakfast

7:30-7:40 Before school supervision 

7:40 First bell rings

7:45 Class begins

7:45-11:00 AM classes

K-2 - 11:00-11:25 Lunch then Recess 11:25-11:45/  Grades 3-5 11:00-11:25 Recess then Lunch 11:25-11:45

11:45-2:45 PM Classes

2:45 Dismissal

 

Early Dismissal time 12:30

 

Family Handbook 2019-2020

Merrill Elementary School

2019-20 Family Handbook


School Phone: 424-0420
School Office Hours: 7:30-3:30
Principal: Tanya Fenner
Secretary: Deb Luedeke

 
Absence Policy
Students are excused from school if they are ill or in case of a family emergency. Parents must call the school office (424-0420) to report their child’s absence. We have voicemail 24 hours a day and must receive your call no later than 8:00. If we are not notified of a child’s absence it will be marked unexcused. Please do not email the teacher and/or secretary with this information, as it is not guaranteed that the message will be received on time, and could result in your child being marked unexcused. We are required to make a safe call to locate an absent child, but the absence will be unexcused. If a student is late, they must check into the office before going to their classroom and pick up a late pass. 

Attendance in school is extremely important for student success. Students are only allowed to miss part or all of 10 school days for any reason. (Ten days add up quickly, especially if a child is tardy). An attendance letter of concern will be sent if a child is accumulating numerous absences or tardies. 

When picking up your child at school prior to dismissal time, it is school policy for parents to meet their child in the office and sign them out. Upon return, the child must be signed back in.  
If you know that your student will be leaving for any reason, please send a note, addressed to the teacher. Students will be called down from their classroom, when the parent/guardian arrives to pick them up. Please allow for this extra time when picking up your child.

Pre-Excused Absences: 
If your child’s absence is planned in advance due to vacation you must complete a Parent Excused Absence form (PEX) prior to the absence. These PEX forms are available in the office. State law limits these absences to 10 days per school year, at which they will be designated as unexcused. Attendance in school is extremely important for student success. Many of the learning experiences that take place each day cannot be replicated in a worksheet or independent activity, so please consider these decisions for absences carefully. 


After School Program/Lighted School House
All children should be accounted for in LIghted School House by 2:50 p.m., by either:
The child being physically present.
The child being on the absentee list or parent calls LSH to notify that the child will not be attending. 920-410-3973.
Lighted School House has been informed by the teacher that the child is still in the classroom or participating in some other after school function.

Please contact Mr. Hollnagel the Lighted School House Coordinator with any questions at evan.hollnagel@oshkosh.k12.wi.us . 


                                                    Arrival/Dismissal
Students are not to arrive at school before 7:30 a.m. as there is no playground supervision prior to this time. Students arriving before 7:30 are expected to participate in the breakfast program and will be charged accordingly. At the first bell students are to enter by the assigned doors. During inclement weather, students are welcome to wait in the building in designated areas from 
7:30 a.m. - 7:40 a.m. Students are to sit quietly in the designated area. Once on school grounds, students are expected to stay unless excused by a supervisor or teacher and with parent or guardian approval.

When classes are dismissed at 2:45 p.m., children are to leave the building and go directly home. They will not be able to wait for Middle School siblings. When picking up your child, please be courteous to the buses entering our playground and do not park on the left side of the street. 


Bicycles
Please remember that our city ordinance requires registration of all bicycles. The school assumes no responsibility for bicycles. However, provisions have been made to safeguard bicycles by requiring them to be properly parked and locked in the school bike racks. Students are required to walk, not ride, bikes on school property.


Birthday Treats
Birthday treats are not permitted. Children’s birthdays may be recognized in the classrooms by songs, etc. Birthdays are a milestone in the lives of children. At our school, children come to visit the principal and receive a free Birthday Book.  Summer birthdays are celebrated at the end of the year. We ask that no individual party invites or gifts be exchanged between students at school. 


Breakfast Program 
Children may purchase breakfast on a daily basis. The cost is $1.40, $.30 for reduced price, and free for those who qualify. The breakfast program begins at 7:15 a.m. At  7:30 all children will be dismissed to the supervised area outside. 


Bullying, Harassment, and Discrimination 
Merrill Elementary supports an educational environment that is free of discrimination, bullying and harassment of any form. “Bullying and Harassment” are engaging in any type of conduct that causes discomfort or humiliation to another person or that interferes with his/her ability to learn and function in the school environment. Examples are: physical or mental abuse, a verbal comment that insults, degrades, or stereotypes another person, offensive or objectionable remarks, and unwanted physical contact. If a student or parent believes bullying or harassment is taking place, they should report the incident to their classroom teacher or the principal immediately.


Change of Address/Telephone
It is extremely important that the school office has current work, home, and emergency phone numbers for all of our parents. If your address or telephone number should change during the school year, please make these changes or corrections on our Infinite Campus Parent Portal. School to home contact during an emergency is imperative.


Dress Code
No student shall be permitted to wear any clothing which is normally identified with a gang or gang-related activities, or clothing that contains pictures and /or writing referring to alcoholic beverages, tobacco products, sexual references, profanity, an/or illegal drugs. This also includes anything worn by the student that could be considered disruptive to the learning environment. Pants should fit well and should not have pockets/seats that hang low or allow underwear to be seen.  Shoes should fit well and be safe. For this reason, we discourage flip-flop sandals and do not allow shoes w/cleats or hidden wheels. Students are not permitted to wear hats or hoods within the building, except on special theme days.  


Emergency School Closing
School closing information can be found on the Oshkosh Area School District website at www.oshkosh.k12.wi.us. You will also be updated via the Infinite Campus parent portal. During school hours, have an “Emergency Plan” worked out with your child in the case of early dismissal.


Field Trips Permission Forms
Field trips to off school sites provide educational experiences to extend the classroom learning and are often a part of each grade level’s program opportunities. Parent permission will be sought ahead of time as is required in order for any child to participate. The permission must be in writing and given prior to the field trip taking place. Please remember for your child’s safety, we must have written permission.  We cannot accept verbal permission. We welcome parent chaperones. Just a reminder that the district requires a background check on all volunteers at least two weeks prior to the event. This can be completed on the district website at: http://human-resources.oshkosh.k12.wi.us/. Once completed, please notify the school office so that the application can be processed at the district level. All students must use district transportation to field trips.  

Food Service Payments 
An Infinite Campus Food Service account will be established for your family. Students will enter a 5-digit pin number to get a breakfast, hot lunch, or milk to go with their sack lunch, at which time the account will be deducted. Snack milk will also be processed through the automated system. Parent/Guardians may make payments via their Infinite Campus Parent Portal account. They may also send cash or check payments to the office. 


Breakfast/Hot Lunch/Milk - GREAT NEWS FOR 2019-20
The Oshkosh Area School District is pleased to inform you that we will be implementing the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) while participating in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs for the 2019-20 School Year.  What does this mean for Merrill Families? All Merrill Elementary students are eligible to receive a healthy breakfast and lunch at school at NO CHARGE each day for the 2019-20 school year.  Your students will be able to participate in these meal programs without having to pay a fee or submit an application.  Please note that families that wish to receive additional benefits that the program provides such as free snack milk, dental care, and waived student fees, you must still complete the application as noted below.  

Free and Reduced Lunches for the 2019-20 School Year
All Merrill Elementary students will be able to receive free breakfast and lunch each day; however, to be eligible for additional benefits such as waived fees, dental services, and free snack milk, you must apply for the program.  All households were already mailed applications for the free or reduced lunch program.  A new application must be completed each year to be eligible for the lunch program.  If you have questions, please contact the Food Services Department at West High School 424-4936.

The Oshkosh Area School District has a free breakfast and lunch and reduced breakfast and lunch program for those who qualify. Applications will be sent to all Oshkosh Area families before the start of the school year. If you do not receive one or your home circumstances change, please contact the office for an application. Families are encouraged to complete the application even if they choose not to participate in the program. Part of the financial aid our school receives is dependent upon the number of families eligible for free or reduced lunch.  


Illness and Injury
In case of illness or injury, your child will be temporarily cared for by a member of the staff.  If necessary, as in the case of a 100 degree fever or higher, parents or their designee will be called to pick the child up.  

An emergency telephone number where parents can be reached either at home or work must be on file at the school. Please update any number changes or corrections via the parent portal. Children may not return to school within 24 hours of a fever. 

Our schools report their daily illnesses to Winnebago County Health Department in order to keep close tabs on any increases in illness. Nurses and administrators in our district are notified of any outbreaks from the health department.

As a family, please remember to practice proper hand washing techniques, maintain a healthy diet and get an adequate amount of rest. It is important to keep your child home if they are experiencing any of the following symptoms: thick mucus from the nose, diarrhea, discharge from eyes or ears, persistent sneezing, open sore, persistent productive cough, nausea or vomiting, sore throat, persistent abdominal discomfort, red eyes, fever of 100 degrees or higher or warm flushed skin, toothache or tenderness/swelling of jaw, excessive drowsiness, earache, or any undiagnosed rash. Furthermore, it is important that your student remain home for 24 hours fever-free without the use of medication before returning to school. The same 24 hour requirement is in place for vomiting and/or diarrhea. The student must remain home for 24 hours from the last episode of vomiting or diarrhea. By following these guidelines, we can work together to limit the spread of illness in our schools.  


Medication/Treatment Policy
(Based on WI statute 118.29) Medication may not be dispensed by school personnel until the parent or guardian has completed the Medication Treatment Request Form. Medication must be supplied in a properly labeled container from the pharmacy with the following information: Student’s name, physician’s name, name of medication, dosage and the pharmacy name, as well as, telephone number. Medication Request Forms can be obtained from the school office. Medications can not be transported by the child, it must be an adult. 

                        Non-prescription medications
The OASD Medication Policy does not allow for written notes from parent/guardian for over the counter medications, such as cough drops, cough medicine, headache medication, etc. These types of medications will also need to have a Medication Request Form completed. Medication Request Forms can be obtained in the school office. A physician’s signature is not required for over the counter medications, unless prescribed for 10 consecutive days. 

Notice of Surveillance
The school is using video surveillance/electronic monitoring to observe, monitor, and/or record the behavior and activity of all persons on school property or grounds, or participating in school functions. 


Parent Teacher Conferences
Teachers schedule Meet, Greet & Unpack conferences in September for Merrill and Academic Progress Conferences at semester. All other conferences are scheduled on an as needed basis. Parents are notified in advance when a conference is being scheduled. If at any time you feel you would like an additional conference with your child's teacher or the principal, please contact the school and arrangements will be made.


Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) 
The PTO is comprised of interested parents and teachers who meet monthly during the school year.  Parent members assist in various school activities, events, and fundraisers.

PTO also provides an opportunity for parents to meet staff members and to learn more about the school. Your support is needed and we encourage your participation. For more information, watch the school newsletters or call the school office.


Parent Volunteers
Volunteers are a valuable resource. Parents are encouraged to help in classroom programs, media center, and with special activities. Call the office or contact your child’s teacher if you have time or skills that you can donate to make our school a better place for students to learn and grow. Due to safety concerns, district policy (see Board Policy 861) requires volunteers to complete the Volunteer Application process allowing for a background check. This is an online application that you can complete through the OASD website. The website address is: http://human-resources.oshkosh.k12.wi.us/. Once completed, please notify the school office so that the application can be processed at the district level. Please complete this simple process at least two weeks before you intend to help out in the classroom or chaperone. 


Pet Policy
Board of Education guidelines were established to protect children’s safety. For this reason, parents or caretakers are not allowed to bring their pets onto school grounds when they are meeting their children. There is a city ordinance forbidding the presence of any animals on school grounds.


Physical Education and Recess
Students are expected to participate in physical education classes and go outside for recess unless a doctor’s written excuse states the contrary. A doctor’s request should specify the type of phy ed activities a child is able and unable to participate in. A doctor’s excuse will be required for indoor recess as well as classrooms may not have adequate supervision when all the other children and teachers are outside. 

Weather permitting, students have recess each day. Decisions to have recess outside during inclement weather depend on temperature and wind chill factor and are made according to the Oshkosh Area School District Guidelines: The students will stay inside if one or more of the following apply:  Rain, temperatures less than 10 degrees; or wind chills 0 degrees or below.


Inclement Weather Wear
All children need a pair of snow boots at school so they are able to play on the playground and still have dry feet in the classroom. If they do not have the extra foot covering they will have to spend recess in a designated area.
Snow Pants are required for grades K-3. If a child chooses to not wear snow pants, then he/she will be required to stay on the black top area. Students in grades 4-5 are only required to wear snow boots but snow pants are strongly encouraged because if they get wet, we do not have extra clothing for them.Students should also have a hat, mittens or gloves. 
All students will be expected to wear a jacket  outside as long as the temperature is below 50 degrees. When the temperature is at or above 50 degrees the children will be able to choose if they want a jacket or not.
Students will be indoors for recess when the outside temperature is less than 10 degrees, or the wind chill is less than 0 degrees. 


Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports (PBIS)- The Merrill Way 
We have a school wide goal of creating a respectful, responsible, and safe learning environment. To help us reach our goal, we need the cooperation of staff, parents, and students. We are in our fourth year of a proactive behavior system called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). There are several components to support this process:
Behaviors are taught with the Mustang Way Expectations Matrix (simple, clearly defined behavioral expectations based on respect, responsibility, and safety that are stated positively and depicted in all areas around the building)
Behaviors are acknowledged (school wide reinforcements are used with all students in the building to recognize when behavioral expectations are modeled)
Behaviors are corrected proactively (behaviors are re-taught, modeled, and practiced with students that are struggling)
 

Public use of Tobacco Products
Please be aware that the Oshkosh Board of Education has adopted a policy prohibiting the use and possession of tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, by any person on school premises or at school events (WI statute 101.123). Parents and all spectators are asked to comply with no smoking policies. This policy has been adopted to insure a safe and healthy school environment for all persons.

                                       Report Cards
Report cards are issued two times a year for grades K-5. They will be available to view on the Parent Portal. http://oshkoshwi.infinitecampus.org/campus/portal/oshkosh.jsp.


Safety Procedure and Drills
As a school, we practice routine fire, tornado, and security drills, just as you do in your home. In the event of a potential issue in the building, students and staff practice security drills. We also have arrangements in place to vacate the building. 


School Day Snacks
Each day every classroom has a designated time for recess milk and a snack. If your child would like to eat a snack, please send something HEALTHY for them to have at this time. School snack guidelines can be found on our website under documents. School Snack Guidelines 
                                    

               
Student Toys/Electronics 
There is not an educational need for students to bring any electronic device to school. Because of this reason, students are asked not to bring toys/cell phones/electronics to school unless they are part of a class activity. Toys/cell phones/electronics get lost, broken and are a source of distraction for students. Staff members will not be responsible for toys/cell phones/electronics that students choose to bring to school. Toys/cell phones/electronics that are disruptive will be taken from the student and at the teacher’s discretion and returned at the end of the day either to the student or the parent. In extreme instances parents will be asked to come to school to retrieve the disruptive item. If there is a legitimate need for a student to have a cell phone, we ask that students keep them turned off and secure in their backpacks while on school grounds. This will hopefully decrease the likelihood that the phone would be lost, damaged or taken as the district accepts no responsibility for the loss, theft or damage of these items. Any property is the sole responsibility of the student who brought the device to school and we would hate to have something happen to this often expensive equipment.   


Visitors
We welcome volunteers and visitors to our classrooms. If you would like to visit, let your child’s teacher know in advance. Any person who is not a staff member or student entering the building from 7:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m. is considered a visitor and must enter at door 7, sign in at the office and get a visitor's badge. Any person in the building without a visitor badge will be directed to the office. This is for the safety of our children. 

Weapons Policy
Under federal and state law, “…. No one shall possess or use a dangerous weapon or look-alike weapon in school buildings, on school grounds, in school vehicles, or at school sponsored activities…”  Look-alike weapons include toys, so please remember this when helping your child choose their Halloween costume.  


Community Events

The OASD Community Calendar spotlights events throughout the area. Calendar items pertain to activities in the community that benefit students and parents. There is no fee for event listings are they are provided as a public service.  Events include community sponsored events, youth programs, parenting classes, student contests, etc.  Those organizations that wish to have an event posted can submit information using the Community Event Form. The district reserves the right to determine what events shall and shall not be placed on the Community Calendar.

Call 211!  Having difficulty finding the resources you need?                                
To connect to community service, help is just 3 digits away. United Way 211 provides easy access to health and human services. Dial 2-1-1- for help with information about  food resources, counseling, employment, health care, child care, support groups, housing, clothing, after school programs, or legal aid.  It’s FREE, confidential and available 24/7  

Questions, Concerns, Suggestions
In the Oshkosh Area School District, we are dedicated to providing the best educational program possible for our children. Should something occur that you have a question about or are unhappy, please give your child’s teacher a call first and then your child’s principal so that they can work together with you to address your need. If you have a concern that you have been unable to resolve with a staff member or the principal, you may call the district office at 424-0395 and they will help you address your concern and/or connect you with others who can help.

American Disabilities Accommodations
Upon request, reasonable auxiliary aids and services will be provided to individuals                                     
with disabilities. If assistance is required, please provide advance notice by calling the                                      
school office for school events or the district office at 424-0395 for district events.

Non-Discrimination Statement
No student shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in any curricular, extracurricular, student services, recreational or other program or activity on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, race, national origin, ancestry, color, creed, religion, pregnancy, marital or parental status, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability.  When separation by sex in education activities is appropriate for health and/or safety reasons, equal educational opportunities shall be provided for both sexes.

2019-2020 Student Calendar
 

2019-2020 Title 1 Program Plan

2019-20 Implementing a Schoolwide Program- Title 1 Plan

 

There are three required components of a schoolwide program that are essential to effective implementation: conducting a comprehensive needs assessment, preparing a comprehensive schoolwide plan, and annually reviewing and revising, as necessary, the schoolwide plan. (ESEA section 1114(a)(1))

 

  • Conducting a comprehensive needs assessment. To ensure that a school’s comprehensive plan best serves the needs of those children who are failing, or are at-risk of failing, to meet challenging State academic standards, the school must conduct a comprehensive needs assessment. (ESEA section 1114(b)(6)). Through a needs assessment, a school must consult with a broad range of stakeholders, including parents, school staff, and others in the community, and examine relevant academic achievement data to understand students’ most pressing needs and their root causes. (ESEA section 1114(b)(2); 34 C.F.R. § 200.26(a)). Where necessary, a school should attempt to engage in interviews, focus groups, or surveys, as well as review data on students, educators, and schools to gain a better understanding of the root causes of the identified needs.

  • Preparing a comprehensive schoolwide plan that describes how the school will improve academic achievement throughout the school, but particularly for the lowest-achieving students, by addressing the needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment. (ESEA section 1114(b)(7)). The schoolwide plan must include a description of how the strategies the school will be implementing will provide opportunities and address the learning needs of all students in the school, particularly the needs of the lowest-achieving students. (ESEA section 1114(b)(7)(A)(i), (iii)). The plan must also contain descriptions of how the methods and instructional strategies that the school intends to use will strengthen the academic program in the school, increase the amount and quality of learning time, and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, including programs and activities necessary to provide a well-rounded education. (ESEA section 1114(b)(7)(A)(ii)). To ensure that the plan results in progress toward addressing the needs of the school, the plan should include benchmarks for the evaluation of program results. This plan may be integrated into an existing improvement plan.  

  • Annually evaluating the schoolwide plan, using data from the State’s assessments, other student performance data, and perception data to determine if the schoolwide program has been effective in addressing the major problem areas and, in turn, increasing student achievement, particularly for the lowest-achieving students. Schools must annually revise the plan, as necessary, based on student needs and the results of the evaluation to ensure continuous improvement. (ESEA section 1114(b)(3); 34 C.F.R. § 200.26(c)).

A Schoolwide program’s purpose is to generate high levels of academic achievement in core subject areas for all students, especially those students most in need. In Schoolwide programming, a comprehensive plan provides a blueprint for all core operations in the Schoolwide program. This plan brings focus and coherence to activities and helps ensure unity of purpose, alignment, and clear accountability. 


 

 

Title I Schoolwide Program Evaluation for 2018-2019 

Title I Schoolwide Program Plan for 2019-2020

 

School Name:

Merrill Elementary School

School Address:

108 W. New York

Building Principal:

Tanya Fenner

Email Address:

Tanya.fenner@oshkosh.k12.wi.us

Phone:

(920) 424-0420

Title IA Coordinator:

Debra Zarling

Phone:

920-424-0108

Email Address:

debra.zarling@oshkosh.k12.wi.us

School District Name:

Oshkosh Area School District

Superintendent:

Dr. Vickie Cartwright

Phone:

(920)-424-0428

Email address:

vickie.cartwright@oshkosh.k12.wi.us

 

 

Program Synopsis:

 

  • Provide an overview description of the Schoolwide Title I efforts for the 2019-2020 school year and relate this focus to relevant district/state standards.

 

As one of 14 elementary schools in the Oshkosh Area School District, we recognize the need to raise student achievement by closing opportunity gaps. Within our building, our past goals have improved on the quality of universal instruction. As we continue this focus, we will add another layer of professional learning that involves district initiatives - thinking journals, conferring, grand conversations and how to use independent reading time more effectively. 

 

 

Consultation

 

A school must consult with a broad range of stakeholders, including parents, school staff, and community members. (ESEA section 1114(b)(2); 34 C.F.R. § 200.26(a)).

 

  • List the members of your planning team, including parent representatives. Additional representatives may be included but those listed below are required. Please indicate each person’s position (teacher, parent, etc.). Have each member initial after his/her name to verify participation.

Tanya Fenner Principal

Michael Dexheimer IST - Literacy

Kathryn Riederer IST - Math 

Amy Sippert K-2 Classroom Teacher 

Jessica Pinkell 3-5 Classroom Teacher

Shelly Rhode Parent



 

 

Schoolwide Planning Summary

  • Summarizes the steps and activities of the planning process. This includes planning team meetings, subcommittee work sessions, parent meetings, staff meetings, etc. where planning took place as well as other activities conducted that contributed toward the development of this plan (i.e. needs assessment data collection and analysis, inquiry process).

  

Meeting Dates

Agenda Topics/ Planning Steps

Participants at Meetings (check all that apply)

School/ District Staff

Parents

Community Members

9.12

Literacy Handbook Specifics and Book Study sign up

X

 

 

9.19

Title 1 Plan overview: Literacy and Math schedules, assessments

X

 

 

9.26

Book Study Groups 

X

   

9.27

Family Picnic

X

X

X

10.3

PBIS topics

X

 

 

10.17

Bright Bytes Survey, PBIS Survey

X

 

 

         

10.24

DRA analysis; Literacy thinking journals 

X

 

 

10.25

Boo Bash

X

X

X

10.31

Book Study Groups 

     

11.7

PBIS Tier 2 Rollout

X

 

 

11.8

Conferences

X

X

X

11.12

Conferences

X

X

X

11.14 

Designing strategic and leveled reading groups, schedule planning to incorporate groups

X

   

11.28

AVMR Data Dig

X

   

12.5

Discussing Hattie’s work and how it’s used in our classrooms

X

   

12.19

Book Study Groups 

X

   

1.2

Educlimber Training

X

   

1.9

Teacher Menu’s - What are you hungry for?

X

   

1.16

What is your joy and why?

X

   

1.23

Book Study Groups 

X

   

2.5

Conferences

X

X

X

2.6

AVMR Sharing Showcase

X

   

2.13

Paper Tigers

X

   

2.20

Refining your literacy block to meet the needs of all learners

X

   

2.27

Book Study Groups 

X

   

3.20

Book Study Groups 

X

   

4.17

Visioning for 2019-2020

X

   

4.24

Book Study Groups 

X

   

5.8

Title I Planning

X

   

5.15

Title I Planning

X

   

5.16

Spring Showcase

X

X

X

5.22

Book Study Groups 

X

   

5.29

Title I Planning

X

   

6.5

Book Study Groups 

X

X

 

 





 

Communication Plan

 

  • Describe the processes and opportunities provided to develop the schoolwide plan:

 

  Staff discussed Literacy, Math, and Family involvement goals for the 19-20 school year with all staff.

 

Staff surveys were completed that included feedback for Title I goals, Family Involvement, and Professional Development opportunities. 


 

  • Describe the processes and opportunities provided to inform, solicit, and receive input from stakeholders:

 

Staff survey results were shared at a staff meeting and were used to develop goals, professional development opportunities, and family events. 

 

The Family Involvement Committee created three family nights for families during the 2018-19 school year that provided support in literacy and math. 

 

  1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment

 

(A) A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school (including taking into account the needs of migratory children as defined in section 1309(2)) that is based on information which includes the achievement of children in relation to the State academic content standards and the State student academic achievement standards described in section 1111(b)(1).

 

From the USDE guidance: A school must consult with a broad range of stakeholders (as indicated above) and examine relevant academic achievement data to understand students’ most pressing needs and their root causes. A school should attempt to engage in interviews, focus groups, or surveys, as well as review data on students, educators, and schools to gain a better understanding of the root causes of the identified needs.

 

  • School Profile (a brief description of our school and the community in which it is located along with our school’s mission/vision.)

 

Merrill Elementary is a K-5 elementary school with 271 students.  72% of students qualify for free or reduced lunch, 30% of students receive special education services, and 12% of students receive ELL services.  

 


The Merrill Elementary Mission:

We commit ourselves to educate and inspire all students to achieve full potential.Our students will master basic skills and develop creative and critical thinking abilities. We empower students to be lifelong learners and caring, responsible citizens of our global community.


 

  • Describe the process used to collect and analyze data and determine the highest priority needs.

 

We will use the current OASD Student Ranking Criteria. We will use guidelines provided by the RRCNA for selecting and serving students in the Reading Recovery® program. We will use the current OASD Math Ranking Criteria. We will use guidelines provided by the Math Recovery® for selecting and serving students in the Math Recovery® program.

 

Based on end of year data from the On-Demand Writing Assessments, DRA, PALS, DSA and AVMR, it was determined that in order to improve success for all students, Merrill classroom teachers will differentiate instruction at the universal level. With support from IST staff, classroom level intervention will be provided and as a team decide to provide more intensive intervention for some students by following the OASD Continuum of Supports in Literacy and Math.

 

There will be grade level and building collaborations focusing on using data to inform instruction. Instructional leaders:  IST-Literacy, IST-Math, and principal will continue to support this work.

 

Time in collaboration will be focused on working towards school wide goals set in Literacy, Math and PBIS. We will look for patterns in the data at grade level and building level meetings in both literacy and math.


 

  • Strengths and Areas in Need of Improvement: Summarize the key findings from the comprehensive needs assessment, which includes the key strengths and areas of need based on data gathered.  (Attach data collection worksheet formats, analysis worksheet templates and prioritization artifacts in the appendices of this plan.)

 

 

 

Fall PALS proficient

Spring PALS proficient

Growth

Kindergarten

67% 26/39

66% 25/38

-1%

1st Grade

62% 28/45

76% 34/45

+14%

2nd Grade

66% 26/39

69% 27/39

+3%

 





 

 

Fall DRA Proficiency

Spring DRA Proficiency

Growth

Kindergarten

 

61% 23/38

-

1st Grade

31% 13/42

64% 29/45

+33%

2nd Grade

66% 25/38

72% 28/39

+6%

3rd Grade

59% 22/37

72% 26/36

+13%

4th Grade

33% 14/42

56% 24/43

+23%

5th Grade

59% 23/39

75% 30/40

+16%

Total School

49% 97/198

66% 160/241

+17%

 

Strengths:

Every grade level except 2nd grade made double digit growth on the DRA assessment.

Every grade level except Kindergarten showed growth on the PALS.

Kindergarten increased proficiency in all areas of the PALS although data doesn’t show because of the higher standard towards the end of the year.

First grade had 33% growth in DRA. 

Second grade PALS increased 14% growth from fall to spring. 

Overall there was a 17% proficiency on the DRA.

 

Needs Improvement:

There still seems to be some inconsistency with our DRA matching forwards exam results.

 

Kindergarten struggled with finding a word in text, Reading words in isolation.  Students are perfect pointing but unable to find words in text, even when they can read the text.  They are also not making the transfer from text to words in isolation.

 

Second grade DRA data was stagnant.  One teacher moved two students forward while one teacher didn’t move any students.  Teachers need to focus on small group guided reading and matching books to students.  Less wasted time with brain breaks and more instruction!

 

Third Grade - New teachers need to be coached to learn more about small group guided reading and conferencing.

 

Fourth Grade- New teachers need to be coached to learn more about small group guided reading and conferencing.

 

Fifth Grade- Teachers need to focus on small group instruction, one-on-one conferring and word work.

 

Special Education- communication with classroom teachers, small group literacy instruction especially for our youngest learners.


 

Mathematics

 

Merrill Title I AVMR Data Results End of Year 2018-2019

 

FNWS

Addition/

Subtraction

Structuring

Place Value

Multiplication / Division

Proficiency Levels***

------>

MY

EY

G

MY

EY

G

MY

EY

G

MY

EY

G

MY

EY

G

Kindergarten

22%

42%

20%

61%

79%

18%

7

%

32%

25%

           

Grade 1

     

41%

76%

35%

43%

64%

21%

           

Grade 2

           

32%

41%

9%

8 %

22%

14%

     

Grade 3

                 

42%

45%

3%

29%

43%

14%

Grade 4

                 

40%

50%

10%

42%

48%

6%

Grade 5

                 

49%

59%

10%

44%

54%

10%

***MY= midyear   EY= End of year G= growth


 

Comparison of Title I Math Goals Results: EOY 2017, EOY 2018, Winter 2019 to Spring 2019 (Final Numbers as of 6/10/2019)

Grade Level

Domain

2017

EOY  

2018 

EOY

Winter 2019

Spring 2019

Change from Winter 19 to Spring 19

Kindergarten

Counting and Cardinality

61%

54%

59%

68%

+9%

Kindergarten

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

55%

51%

---------

43%

 

Grade 1

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

53%

61%

64%

84%

+20%

Grade 2

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

56%

42%

39%

26%

-13%

Grade 3

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

57%

48%

37%

50%

+13%

Grade 4

Numbers and Operations - Fractions

32%

(sem I scores)

42%

41%

53%

+12%

Grade 5

Numbers and Operations - Fractions

35%

34%

31%

78%

+47%

Total School

 

48%

46%

45%

57%

+12%

 

Strengths:

Kindergarten - AVMR Addition/Subtraction construct is at 79%, which makes a large percentage of our students proficient in this domain

1st grade - In the domain of Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 63% of first graders are proficient, this is related to the success in AVMR Addition/Subtraction construct (76% proficient)  and Structuring (64% proficient) results. Scores in the domain of Operations and Algebraic Thinking showed and increase of 20% with 84% of the student being proficient.

2nd grade - AVMR Place Value had a 14% gain; assessing all students in Place Value early will  allow teachers the ability to plan instruction based on student understanding.

3rd grade - In the domain of Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 53% of third graders are proficient, with an increase of 16% proficiency from winter to spring scores..  This is a critical area in mathematics for third grade.

4th grade - Scores in the domain of Number and Operations-Fractions are up by 17% from winter to spring, with an overall proficiency of 58%.

5th grade - Growth in the domain of Number and Operations-Fractions is 48%! Overall proficiency is 79%!




 

Areas in Need of Improvement:

Kindergarten - need to add in more work with structure concepts for making 5, recognize spatial patterns and finger patterns, but are unsure of combinations of numbers that make 5 without having their fingers or other support. 

1st grade - continue to add in more work with structure concepts, and addition/subtraction facts for students, because the Bridges program does not have enough in it for consistent practice for student automaticity.

2nd grade - Need to add in more practice in structuring in the number range of 10-20 to build automaticity, need to ensure consistent use of materials in solving addition/subtraction problems with 2- and 3-digit numbers to build understanding of place value.

3rd grade - Need to add in practice early for automaticity of multiplication facts 

4th grade - Need to ensure consistent use of materials in solving place value, multiplication/division, and fraction problems.

5th grade - Need to find time for small group instruction that will move students to proficient in AVMR skills which will then help in all other areas of mathematics.

 

Other Factors:

School population is different year to year and many students move between schools.   There are three Special Education Behavior Programs at our building that address extreme behaviors.  Classrooms are not equipped with all educational materials and curriculum. Special education teachers are not provided with proper training to build content knowledge in literacy.  Special education teachers are providing instruction in literacy and math for all six grade levels.  

 

Goals (SMART) based on the needs assessment and prioritization (1 to 3 strategic goals):

 

  • 2018-2019 - Reflect and Evaluate: Describe the results of the building’s goal(s) and the impact on student achievement as established in the 2018-2019 Program Plan.


 

Student Engagement Goals:

 

Increase student engagement in taking ownership over their behavior and learning. Build relationships and connections with all students to increase engagement at school as measured by pre and post discipline data (office referrals, discipline logs, suspensions), student engagement surveys, and teacher engagement surveys. 

 

All K-5 students and teachers at Merrill Elementary will increase engagement/interest in reading and writing and math by 20% as evidenced by student surveys given at the beginning and the end of the 2018-19 school year.

Data:

  • Student pre and post interest/engagement surveys



 

Results: Student Engagement Scores: Comparison from Fall to Spring

 

 

Fall results

Spring Results

Change from Fall to Spring

Engagement in reading

70%

75%

+5%

Engagement in writing

58%

64%

+6%

Engagement in math

59%

63%

+4%

Engagement in school/learning

87%

90%

+3%

 

Literacy

80% of students will show one years growth + during the 18-19 school year as evidenced by fall to spring DRA. 

Data:

  • Fall and Spring DRA comparisons

Results:

 

 

Fall DRA Proficiency

Spring DRA Proficiency

Growth

Kindergarten

 

61% 23/38

-

1st Grade

31% 13/42

64% 29/45

+33%

2nd Grade

66% 25/38

72% 28/39

+6%

3rd Grade

59% 22/37

72% 26/36

+13%

4th Grade

33% 14/42

56% 24/43

+23%

5th Grade

59% 23/39

75% 30/40

+16%

Total School

49% 97/198

66% 160/241

+17%

 

Math Goal 2018-2019

If we focus on increasing student engagement in math and grow mathematicians through a focus on Standards for Mathematical Practices, we will see a 20% growth in the domains of Counting and Cardinality in kindergarten, Operations and Algebraic Thinking in grades 1-3, and Numbers and Operations-Fractions in grades 4-5 as evidenced in scores reported in Infinite Campus from January 2019 to June 2019. We will also see a 20% growth in AVMR  from January 2019 to June 2019 by grade level in the following domains: Kindergarten- Addition/Subtraction, Structuring, and FNWS; First grade- Addition/Subtraction and Structuring; Second grade- Structuring and Place Value; Third, Fourth and Fifth grade- Place Value and Multiplication/Division.

 

Data:

  • Engagement in math pre and post surveys

  • SMPs in IC and through participation quizzes

  • AVMR for moving student conceptual understanding forward in CCSS-Math standards

  • IC select domains of critical areas of counting and cardinality, operations and algebraic thinking, and numbers operations-fractions

Results: 

Kindergarten made at least 20% growth in AVMR Structuring and FNWS.  First grade also made at least 20% growth in AVMR in Addition/Subtraction Construct and Structuring.  We did not see the growth we had hoped in the other grade levels. In the math domains of CCSS-Math in IC, many grade levels made growth in the teens.  First grade made 20% growth in Operations and Algebraic Thinking and fifth grade made 48% growth in their Numbers and Operations-Fractions domain. 

 

  • 2019-2020 - Plan: List the building’s goal(s) for 2019-2020. State each goal in measurable terms, list the evaluation that will be done to assess it, and the expected impact on student achievement.

 

Literacy Goal:

  • 100% of students will show one years growth, 80% will be proficient or advanced + during the 19-20 school year as evidenced by fall to spring DRA. 

  • 80% of K-2 students will be proficient in PALS by the Spring PALS assessment.

  • Data:

  • Fall and Spring DRA comparisons

  • Fall and Spring PALS comparisons

  • Fall and Spring I- Ready overall score comparison for grades 3 - 5 only 

 

Student work-

Reading Conferences-

Thinking journals vs stop and jots

 

Student deeper thinking- Inferring a message from a book, article -character change, making connections

 

Through the use of weekly reading conferences that focus on teaching specific strategies around deeper thinking, we will see at least one year’s growth from the fall 2019 DRA to spring 2020 DRA for at least 80% of our students.  

 

Resource: A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences by Jennifer Serravallo

 

Through the use of IReady 80% of 3-5 grade students will meet or exceed their typical growth from fall to spring.


 

Math Goal: 

If we focus on increasing student engagement in math and grow mathematicians through a focus on Standards for Mathematical Practices and specifically writing about our thinking , we will see a 20% growth in the domains of Counting and Cardinality in kindergarten, Operations and Algebraic Thinking in grades 1-3, and Numbers and Operations-Fractions in grades 4-5 as evidenced in scores reported in Infinite Campus from January 2020 to June 2020. We will also see a 20% growth in AVMR  from January 2020 to June 2020 by grade level in the following domains: Kindergarten- Addition/Subtraction, Structuring, and FNWS; First grade- Addition/Subtraction and Structuring; Second grade- Structuring and Place Value; Third, Fourth and Fifth grade- Place Value and Multiplication/Division.

 

Data:

  • SMPs in IC and through participation quizzes

  • AVMR for moving student conceptual understanding forward in CCSS-Math standards

  • IC select domains of critical areas of counting and cardinality, operations and algebraic thinking, and numbers operations-fractions

  • I-Ready fall and spring overall score comparison for grades 3-5

 

B.  Schoolwide Reform Strategies

(B) Schoolwide reform strategies that —

(i) provide opportunities for all children to meet the State's proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement described in section 1111(b)(1)(D);

(ii) use effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically based research that —

(I) strengthen the core academic program in the school;

(II) increase the amount and quality of learning time, such as providing an extended school year and before- and after-school and summer programs and opportunities, and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum; and

(III) include strategies for meeting the educational needs of historically underserved populations;

(iii)(I) include strategies to address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of low-achieving children and those at risk of not meeting the State student academic achievement standards who are members of the target population of any program that is included in the schoolwide program, which may include —

(aa) counseling, pupil services, and mentoring services;

(bb) college and career awareness and preparation, such as college and career guidance, personal finance education, and innovative teaching methods, which may include applied learning and team-teaching strategies; and

(cc) the integration of vocational and technical education programs; and

(II) address how the school will determine if such needs have been met; and

(iv) are consistent with, and are designed to implement, the State and local improvement plans, if any.

 

From the USDE guidance:  A comprehensive schoolwide plan must describe how the school will improve academic achievement for all students, particularly for the lowest-achieving students, by addressing the needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment. (ESEA section 1114(b)(7)). The schoolwide plan must include a description of how the strategies the school will be implementing will provide opportunities and address the learning needs of all students in the school, particularly the needs of the lowest-achieving students. (ESEA section 1114(b)(7)(A)(i), (iii)). The plan must also contain descriptions of how the methods and instructional strategies that the school intends to use will strengthen the academic program in the school, increase the amount and quality of learning time, and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, including programs and activities necessary to provide a well-rounded education. (ESEA section 1114(b)(7)(A)(ii)).

 

  • Describe the methods that will be used to strengthen the core academic program and explain how the planned curricular and instructional program emerges from high, challenging content and performance standards and grade level benchmarks. Reference the OASD Academic Standards.

 

Literacy:  Classroom teachers will follow the OASD Units of Study in Reading, Lucy Calkins Units of Study in Writing, and district mandated curriculum materials.  In addition to universal instruction requirements, Reading Recovery will be offered for individual students of need, small group instruction, and literacy coaching support will be available for all classrooms, as needed.

 

Math:  Classroom teachers will follow the Bridges math curriculum, including possible interventions from the program’s intervention binders.  Teachers will also use their knowledge of AVMR testing, data collections, and intervention/differentiation work to meet the needs of students who are not proficient in the math standards.  In addition to universal instruction requirements, Math Recovery will be offered for individual students of need, small group instruction, and math coaching support will be available for all classrooms, as needed.

 

Classroom teacher and literacy/math coach will meet to review data to make decisions about practices for at-risk students who are not meeting standards and need to make gains. 

 

Using coaching cycles, the classroom teacher and math/literacy coach will collaboratively plan how to use effective instructional strategies. The math/literacy coach and classroom teacher will meet to discuss progress, data, and plans and make changes as needed.

 

Teachers and coaches will meet together to discuss AVMR/DRA/PALS test results, make decisions on what needs to happen in the classroom, how to assist teachers in these areas, and how to improve universal and differentiated instruction.

 

  • Explain how the proposed plan provides effective instructional strategies that increase the amount and quality of learning time (extended learning time) for students at-risk of not meeting standards. Include information about before/after school and summer programs.

 

Lighted School House, our elementary Community Learning Center program, serves any student that is in need of a safe and fun place after school. Programs are designed to enrich learning experiences in an afterschool setting. The program operates Monday-Friday from 2:45-5:00 pm each school day, with extended pickup available until 6:00 pm for those families that need it. We provide a healthy snack after school, academic enrichment activities, field trips into the community, and additional tutoring opportunities

 

C. Instruction by Highly Qualified Staff

 

(C) Instruction by highly qualified teachers.

 

OASD Board Policy - Employment of Professional Staff - po3120

 

  • Describe the qualifications of the school’s instructional staff. 

Merrill Elementary has 12 regular education classroom teachers for grades K-5 (two teachers per grade).  Merrill also has an integrated Kindergarten, one self contained EBD and one integrated EBD and an Encompass classroom.  In addition, we have music, art, and phy ed specialists that are in our building daily. We have 6 special education teachers, 1 speech/language teachers, and 1 ELL teachers.   Four instructional support teachers provide support, coaching, and monthly team meetings for the school. All staff are licensed in their respective areas of teaching. Ten paraprofessionals also assist in our classrooms with individual students and small groups.  All paras meet the district requirements for being highly-qualified. 

 

D. Professional Development Plan

 

(D) In accordance with section 1119 and subsection (a)(4), high-quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals and, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff to enable all children in the school to meet the State's student academic achievement standards.

 

The goal of a Title I Professional Development Plan is “to support and advance the efforts of instructors and other appropriate persons through intensive and sustained professional development opportunities.”

 

Professional Development plans must:

  • connect to state standards

  • reflect research on teaching and learning

  • be designed to have a positive impact on teacher performance

  • contribute to continuous improvement

  • include methods to teach students with special needs

  • be developed with extensive participation of teachers

  • be intensive

  • be ongoing and sustained

 

  • 2018-2019 - Reflect and Evaluate: Provide a narrative description of the results of this past year’s staff development as outlined in your 2018-2019 Program Plan. Include descriptions of the training provided and the staff members involved. Also, describe how teaching and learning have been affected in your school.

 

Building Collaborations: Here is what we accomplished during our building collaborations this year. Kathy, Dex, and Sarah provided the PD on the following topics.


 

9.12

Literacy Handbook Specifics and Book Study sign up

9.19

Title 1 Plan overview: Literacy and Math schedules, assessments

9.26

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

9.27

Family Picnic

10.3

PBIS topics

10.17

Bright Bytes Survey, PBIS Survey

10.24

DRA analysis; Literacy thinking journals 

10.25

Boo Bash

10.31

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

11.7

PBIS Tier 2 Rollout

11.8

Conferences

11.12

Conferences

11.14 

Designing strategic and leveled reading groups, schedule planning to incorporate groups

11.28

AVMR Data Dig

12.5

Discussing Hattie’s work and how it’s used in our classrooms

12.19

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

1.2

Educlimber Training

1.9

Instructional Collaborator Menu - What are you hungry for?**

1.16

What is your joy and why?

1.23

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

2.5

Conferences

2.6

AVMR Sharing Showcase

2.13

Paper Tigers- the relationship between learning and emotional health

2.20

Literacy Block: Refining your literacy block to meet the needs of all learners

2.27

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

3.20

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

4.17

Visioning for 2019-2020

4.24

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

5.8

Title I Planning

5.15

Title I Planning

5.16

Spring Showcase

5.22

Book Study Groups 

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

5.29

Title I Planning

6.5

Book Study Groups Celebration Share Out

  • Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

  • Kids 1st From Day 1

  • Teaching With Poverty In Mind

  • Wild Card

** Instructional Collaborator Menu was given to all teachers.  They chose from a list of support / professional development ideas for both literacy and math.  These lists then helped guide literacy and math team meetings for the remainder of the year. We will be using these menus for 2019-2020 to continue our work with teachers individually and in small groups to fine tune the work we do with grade levels and individual teachers.

 

Grade Level Team Meetings:

 

Literacy- This year in grades 3-4-5, we welcomed three first year classroom teachers and two classroom teachers taught at a new grade level.  Five out of the six staff members were in a new position. We also had a new intermediate Literacy Resource Teacher join our staff from September through February. A retired Literacy Resource Teacher was able to help for three days a week from April through June.  Support was limited this year so it focused on organizing the workshop and getting Guided Reading up and running.  

 

We also focused on word work in grades K-3. During our grade level team time we looked at data and determine next steps for instruction in the area of phonics and word work.

 

Math- This year we did traditional grade level meetings. We focused every month on the Unit Overviews and the skills for mastery.  We also looked at skills that needed ongoing focus for student learning. We solved problems using multiple representations/models/materials as teachers, to promote this work in classrooms.  We worked on incorporating the Math Learning Center Apps within our math block to increase student engagement and understanding. The ongoing agenda for each grade level is listed below:

Kindergarten Merrill 2018-2019 Grade Level Team Mtg Agenda/Min 

Grade 1 Merrill 2018-2019 Grade Level Team Mtg Agenda/Min 

Grade 2 Merrill 2018-2019 Grade Level Team Mtg Agenda/Min

Grade 3 Merrill 2018-2019 Grade Level Team Mtg Agenda/Min 

Grade 4 Merrill 2018-2019 Grade Level Team Mtg Agenda/Min

Grade 5 Merrill 2018-2019 Grade Level Team Mtg Agenda/Min  

 

  • 2019-2020 - Plan: Describe how the school’s professional development needs for 2019-2020 were determined.

 

Based on staff discussions and staff consensus on OASD math and literacy expectations, as well as staff beliefs and expectations, an action plan with goals and objectives for professional development was developed. The plan also involved the analysis of student data to inform this decision as it aligned with Danielson domains and components. 

 

The Title I team conducted a yearly data dig (spring 2019)  to collect and analyze the results of yearly goals. This data is utilized to inform instructional focus and future professional development initiatives. Staff also reflected on professional practice and goals moving forward. Staff completed a survey on teaching practices and needs.

At the onset of the 2019 school year data was analyzed in the area of literacy from Forward Exam, DRA and On Demands with administration. Data results demonstrated that text types and purposes across all genres were a needed area of focus. Along with this it was determined that elaboration and craft would be a focus for staff development. 

 

To plan for future PD, whether it be coaching or whole-staff development, the Math and Literacy ISTs met with each staff in grade level team meetings to determine their needs of professional development support in the classroom and training. Furthermore, all staff participated in surveys which highlighted areas of focus.  The Instructional Collaborator Menu helped identify future needs.

 

  • 2019-2020 - Plan: Describe the school’s plan for intensive, sustained professional development including how the plan supports the school goal(s) and links to district initiatives (e.g., standards and benchmarks, comprehensive literacy, differentiated instruction, etc.). Include information for the multiple layers of professional development available.

 

General Description: 

  1. Literacy: 80% of students will show one years growth + during the 19-20 school year as evidenced by fall to spring DRA. 

 
  1. Math: If we focus on increasing student engagement in math and grow mathematicians through a focus on Standards for Mathematical Practices and specifically writing about our thinking , we will see a 20% growth in the domains of Counting and Cardinality in kindergarten, Operations and Algebraic Thinking in grades 1-3, and Numbers and Operations-Fractions in grades 4-5 as evidenced in scores reported in Infinite Campus from January 2020 to June 2020. We will also see a 20% growth in AVMR from January 2020 to June 2020 by grade level in the following domains: Kindergarten- Addition/Subtraction, Structuring, and FNWS; First grade- Addition/Subtraction and Structuring; Second grade- Structuring and Place Value; Third, Fourth and Fifth grade- Place Value and Multiplication/Division.

Professional Development Goal

Action Steps

Setting (e.g., Building, Literacy Team, Individual Coaching, etc.)

80% of students will show one years growth + during the 19-20 school year as evidenced by fall to spring DRA. 

  • Administer and analyze Fall, Winter, and Spring DRA 

  • Administer and score quarterly writing responses 

  • Literacy team level meetings

  • School-wide collaborations

Staff book study- Reading Conferences: Jennifer Serravallo

  • Create schedule for reading

  • Set up collaboration dates and data check points

  • Literacy team level meetings

  • School-wide collaborations

Staff Development Menu for coaching supports

  • Administer and collect coaching menus

  • Set up meetings dates with teachers to offer coaching supports

20% growth in AVMR from January 2020 to June 2020 by grade level in the following domains: Kindergarten- Addition/Subtraction, Structuring, and FNWS; First grade- Addition/Subtraction and Structuring; Second grade- Structuring and Place Value; Third, Fourth and Fifth grade- Place Value and Multiplication/Division

  • Analyze AVMR data from Spring to set classroom goal(s)

  • Set up individual meetings with classroom teachers

  • Math team level meetings

  • School-wide collaborations

  • Individual meetings with classroom teachers

Focus on Standards for Mathematical Practices and specifically writing about our thinking , we will see a 20% growth in the domains of Counting and Cardinality in kindergarten, Operations and Algebraic Thinking in grades 1-3, and Numbers and Operations-Fractions in grades 4-5 as evidenced in scores reported in Infinite Campus from January 2020 to June 2020

  • Develop plans for introduction of SMP rollout in beginning of year

  • Look for problem solving opportunities within Bridges Units that tie to SMP scoring

  • Develop participation quizzes for grades 2-5 for student ownership of mathematical practices

  • Math team level meetings

  • School-wide collaborations

  • Individual meetings with classroom teachers

     


 

E. Strategies to Attract Highly Qualified Teachers

 

(E) Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools.

 

OASD Board Policy - Wisconsin Quality Educator Initiative - po3125


 

F.  Family Engagement Plan

 

(F) Strategies to increase parental involvement in accordance with section 1118, such as family literary services.

 

OASD Board Policy - Parent/Guardian and Family Engagement in Title I Programs - po2261.01

 

  • Describe how parents and families are involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of the compact and the schoolwide plan. How will you know that parents are satisfied and how will their input be used to adjust?


 

Family nights were held during the 2018-19 school year that introduced and provided support in literacy and math. 

 

Feedback was elicited from parents at the 2018-19 school year. 

 

The school compact was shared twice a year with parents at parent/teacher conferences. The first meeting establishes expectations of the parents, student and school in our work together toward the plan. The second meeting reviews the expectations, is a check in to see how those things are at home, school and with the student. Additional ideas that come up or are shared throughout the year can be added to the plan or noted to discuss with the following plan.

 

  • Describe how the school is carrying out the activities for building capacity for involvement - include a description for each of the following:

  1. Provide assistance to parents to understand content standards, assessments, Title I programming, monitoring child’s progress and how to work with educators

  2. Provide materials and training for parents

  3. Provide training for school staff on the importance of parent involvement

  4. Coordinate with parent involvement in other programs in the school

  5. Provide information in a format that is understandable to parents

  6. Provide other reasonable support as requested

 

Parents of Merrill students were encouraged to participate in school-wide Title I activities and were kept informed about the program and their children’s progress. Two-way communications, both verbal and written, provided a sound base for a good partnership between the school and home to provide a sound base for a good partnership between the school and home that provided an effective educational program for all students.

 

The Parent-School Compact was given to all parents in the fall and described how parent, school staff, and the students will share the responsibility for improving student achievement.

 

Parent Contact times included: 

Open House and Get to Know You Conferences in late August

Title I Math and Literacy Night in September

February parent-teacher conferences

May- Spring Showcase of Learning

 

During these meetings, parents met with the staff to learn about the Title I program, ask questions give input and get feedback. Efforts were made to assist parents in understanding national, state and district standards, student performance standards, the school curriculum, and school expectations and assessment results. The assessment results included running records, assessment matrices, progress reports, report cards, parent conferences, and standardized state and district test results.

 

Efforts were made to accommodate parents with disabilities and to provide information to parents in the language used at home. Parents were encouraged to visit the school for training and materials, to visit their child’s classes and attend other meetings and events. 

 

There was a few opportunities for parents to share concerns and offer suggestions for the continued improvement of Merrill’s Title I Program through parent input and conversations.

 

A monthly school newsletter was provided that included a multitude of resources to support home-school connections.

 

  • Describe how you provide support for each of these parent groups: accessibility for disabled parents, LEP parents, parents of migratory children.

OASD Board Policy - Public Attendance at School Events -  po9160

 

All parents are invited to all school events. Report cards, process notes, IEP’s, and newsletters can be translated upon request. Translators are also available for any language barriers. Handicap bussing is available for field trips to accommodate any family members needing additional assistance. 

 

  • Parent Representative:

Name: Shelly Rhode

Address: 104 E Custer       

Phone: 920-410-9854

 

  • 2018-2019 - Reflect and Evaluate: Describe your school’s efforts to foster parent involvement during 2018-2019 including family literacy and math activities (e.g., phoning parents before meetings, having children write notes/invitations, etc.).

 

The following events were provided for families, students, and parents:

  • Get to Know You Conferences

  • Open House

  • Family Picnic

  • Title I Math and Literacy Night

  • Boo Bash

  • November Conferences

  • Movie Night

  • February Conferences

  • One Book, One Merrill- All school book club

  • Iditaread Reading Challenge

  • Spring Showcase


 

  • 2019-2020 - Plan: Describe how the needs were determined.

 

A parent survey was given at our Spring Showcase to 51 parents.  It asked questions about event topics, conference time frames, report card updates, family event times, suggestions for improvements and any other feedback. 

 

The results showed a desire for conferences in November and February, increased family events, increased communication opportunities and thankfulness of the current family nights and supports provided by staff.  

 

The findings were shared with staff in May and used to help set up family involvement events, conferences, and meeting times for the 2019-2020 school year. 


 

  • 2019-2020 - Plan: Describe your plans for family engagement for 2019-2020 including family literacy and math activities.

 

General Description:

 

Provide monthly events, using a variety of topics to engage families in the school setting.  

Family Engagement Goal

Action Steps

Setting (e.g., Family Night, Home Connections, etc.)

Increase family night offerings

  • Set up a monthly event for families to attend

  • Family nights, STEM night,conferences, events

Provide conferences in November and February

  • Set conference dates

  • School conferences

Increase literacy support

  • Set up family night focussing on literacy (reading and writing)

  • Family PJ- reading night in January (January 23rd) 

Increase math support

  • Set up family night focussing on math games that families can take home

  • Family Night- Game night with a presentation about math practices (February 20th)

Survey families about needs for 2020-2021 school year

  • Create survey or modify 2019 Spring Survey

  • Administer during Spring Showcase

 

Attach a copy of your school’s Family Engagement Policy and Family Engagement Compact in the Appendices of this document.

 

Merrill El

Conferences: Parent-Student-Teacher Compact w/Signature

 

Open House

Title 1 Family Math/Literacy Night Invite

 

Family Night Power Point

 

Family Literacy Presentation

Open House/Get to know you conferences

Staff Book Clubs

 

Family Engagement

Page 17 and 18

 

G.  Transition Strategies

 

(G) Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First, or a State-run preschool program, to local elementary school programs.

 

Oshkosh Area School District Transition Strategies

  1. Early Childhood to Elementary 

  • Kindergarten Open House is held at each building in the spring for prospective kindergarten children and their parent/guardian

  • The 4K Instructional Support Teachers, Program Support Teachers, and 4K principal meet with each elementary school team to share information regarding behavioral issues and student transitions. In addition, "at a glance" information is provided on all incoming 5K students that were served in the 4K program. Teaching Strategies Gold is inputted in EduClimber so that staff has access to information. 

 

2)  Elementary to Middle School

  • Elementary Instructional Support Teachers, Program Support Teachers and principals meet with middle school teams to share information on academic and social/emotional progress. Data is compiled using a “tagging” system inside of eduCLIMBER to identify students at-risk or in monitoring status. “At-a glance” information is shared with each receiving middle school. Each middle school designs grade 6 transition activities that welcome 6th graders and new students to the school community. This includes parents/families as well as students.

 

H.  Teacher Participation in Making Assessment Decisions

 

(H) Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments described in section 1111(b)(3) in order to provide information on, and to improve, the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.

 

  • Describe how teachers provide input into the decisions regarding the use of school-based academic assessment strategies.

  • How are assessments strategies selected?

  • What decisions are made based on the assessments?

  • How is assessment information shared?

 

The OASD sets benchmarks and standards and teachers follow the assessment schedule provided.  All 

Classroom teachers assess using the DRA and AVMR assessments. Standards Based Grading is used and entered into Infinite Campus for grading.  Results are compiled as a school and grade level and shared with staff during collaborations and or email.  

 

In addition to required state and local assessments, teachers use the following assessment practices as appropriate:

  • Running records - to see what sources of information child is using, if they are monitoring, and if the level of text is appropriate

  • Comprehension rubrics - to monitor proficiency of retellings

  • Thinking journals - to assess the ability to think deeply about text and then write about that thinking

  • Anecdotal records - to record observations from small group teaching or 1:1 reading conferences

  • Writing conference - to record observational notes during conferring sessions with students to guide what could be retaught in small group, individually or whole class, if needed

 

  • With students, feedback is provided:

      • during conferring sessions

      • after running record (strategic behavior(s) used as well as strategic behavior(s) needed)

      • after assessing with comprehension rubric, sharing information included in the retell as well as missing information

      • during writing conferences (e.g. done individually, small group or whole class)

      • in written or verbal form about thinking journal entries

 

    • With parents, feedback is provided through:

      • assignments scored within the online gradebook 

      • updates at conferences, parent phone calls, and meetings

      • student work sent home to be shared with parents

    • For teachers,

      • Anecdotal records are kept for individual analysis or shared with literacy coach if teacher wants assistance in deciding what strategies/skills should be focused on next


 

  • Describe how teachers are involved in student achievement data analysis.
     

Teachers participated in collaborations and provided feedback around data collected in literacy and math.  This data was compiled and also discussed at literacy team meetings. A survey was given in May to staff to elicit feedback around school goals, data collections, trainings and needs of the school.  This was generalized and shared back with staff also in May. This feedback helped provide insights to the 2019-2020 Title I plan.  

 

  1. Assistance for Students Having Difficulty Mastering the Standards

 

(I) Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards required by section 1111(b)(1) shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance which shall include measures to ensure that students' difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.

 

  • Describe strategies for meeting the educational needs of student who are not reaching benchmarks based on state standards and expectations.

 

The Oshkosh Area School District uses a Multi-level System of Support to provide assistance to any student who is experiencing difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of achievement. Initial instruction and differentiated support is provided by the classroom teacher. Additional levels of support are guided and/or provided by Instructional Support Teachers in Literacy (licensed Reading Teachers/Reading Specialists) and/or Instructional Support Teachers in Math (Math Recovery trained).

 

OASD Response to Intervention Continuum of Support in Literacy

 

K-5 OASD Math Continuum of Instruction 2017-18

 

J.  Coordination and Integration of Federal, State and Local Funds and Services

 

(J) Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs, including programs supported under this Act, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training.

 

  • Describe how services provided through federal Title I funds are coordinated with other state and local funds to support student achievement goals. (List State and Local education agency programs and other federal programs that will be included.)

 

Title I funds are coordinated to focus on the improvement of students in literacy and math. Funds are allocated for materials and supplies needed to support student learning and growth in literacy and math. In partnership and collaboration, special education and ELL funds are used in conjunction with Title I funds to work toward closing the achievement gap, provide assistance to students having difficulty mastering the standards and meeting goals, and provide instructional support to students as needed. 

 

Dissemination, Review and Revision

 

From the USDE guidance:  To ensure that the plan results in progress toward addressing the needs of the school, the plan should include benchmarks for the evaluation of program results. This plan may be integrated into an existing improvement plan.

 

  • Describe how this plan will be communicated with all stakeholders.

 

Staff members will be provided professional development time in August to review the 2019-20 Title I Plan.  Parents will be provided with the school goals and plan during fall conferences, Title I Reading and Math night, and through the monthly newsletters.